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Simulation-based medical education: Cost measurement must be comprehensive

Published:December 18, 2012DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2012.10.020
      Zendejas et al
      • Zendejas B.
      • Wang A.T.
      • Brydges R.
      • Hamstra S.J.
      • Cook D.A.
      Cost: the missing outcome in simulation-based medical education research: a systematic review.
      are to be praised for bringing much-needed rigor to the issue of cost and value in medical education generally, and cost and value in simulation-based medical education specifically. Simulation makes for a fascinating test bed for the evaluation of cost effectiveness in medical education—simulation-based education is often expensive and yet has great potential to be effective. Any analysis of cost effectiveness must start with an analysis of costs and so Zendejas et al
      • Zendejas B.
      • Wang A.T.
      • Brydges R.
      • Hamstra S.J.
      • Cook D.A.
      Cost: the missing outcome in simulation-based medical education research: a systematic review.
      are correct to point out the importance of having a comprehensive method of measuring costs associated with simulation. However, we feel that their table outlining the “essential cost ingredients in simulation-based education” suffers from a number of omissions.
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      References

        • Zendejas B.
        • Wang A.T.
        • Brydges R.
        • Hamstra S.J.
        • Cook D.A.
        Cost: the missing outcome in simulation-based medical education research: a systematic review.
        Surgery. 2013; 153: 160-176
        • Ker J.
        • Hogg G.
        Cost-effective simulation.
        in: Walsh K. Cost effectiveness in medical education. Radcliffe, Oxon2010: 61-71

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