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Global Surgery 2030: Evidence and solutions for achieving health, welfare, and economic development

      Remarkable gains have been made in global health in the past 25 years, but progress has not been uniform. Mortality and morbidity from common conditions needing surgery have grown in the world's poorest regions, both in real terms and relative to other health gains. At the same time, development of safe, essential, life-saving surgical and anaesthesia care in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) has stagnated or regressed. In the absence of surgical care, case-fatality rates are high for common, easily treatable conditions including appendicitis, hernia, fractures, obstructed labour, congenital anomalies, and breast and cervical cancer.
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      Reference

        • Kim J.Y.
        Opening address to the inaugural “The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery” meeting.
        The World Bank, Boston, MA, USAJan 17, 2014 (Available from:) (Accessed March 31, 2015)