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Three-dimensional printing of bioactive hernia meshes: In vitro proof of principle

Published:October 07, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2016.08.033
      Three-dimensional (3-D) printing of operative instruments, prostheses, and implants is a topic of considerable interest in both scientific literature and popular media.
      • Michalski M.H.
      • Ross J.S.
      The shape of things to come: 3D printing in medicine.
      • Colasante C.
      • Sanford Z.
      • Garfein E.
      • Tepper O.
      Current trends in 3D printing, bioprosthetics, and tissue engineering in plastic and reconstructive surgery.
      • Weisman J.A.
      • Nicholson J.C.
      • Tappa K.
      • Jammalamadaka U.
      • Wilson C.G.
      • Mills D.K.
      Antibiotic and chemotherapeutic enhanced three-dimensional printer filaments and constructs for biomedical applications.
      Surgical meshes are widely used in hernia repair and may be a candidate for specialized 3-D printing. On-demand, intraoperative 3-D printing of surgical meshes has the potential to facilitate patient-specific medicine. Synthetic and biologic meshes come in many different commercial forms. In hernia repair, these prefabricated meshes often require modification to match patient-specific anatomy. 3-D printing of meshes tailored to intraoperative measurements, patient anatomy, specific situations, and patient comorbidities could improve technical facility, decrease waste, and may even save costs.
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