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Innovation advancement in academic medical centers: optimizing the impact of surgeon ingenuity

  • Alan Bentley
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization, Vanderbilt University, 1207 17th Ave South, Suite 105, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. (A. Bentley).
    Affiliations
    Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA
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  • Christopher Harris
    Affiliations
    Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA
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Published:February 02, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2017.11.012
      A recent Harris Poll ranked physicians as having the most respected occupation—again. Among physician specialties, surgeons are at the head of the class. A major reason for this is their ability to preserve lives by “fixing” the body through surgical intervention. It is important to realize, however, that the use of surgical skill and medical judgment is not the only way surgeons can improve patient care and save lives—in fact, it may not even be the most profound way. Because surgeons as a group must often be highly innovative to save lives, leveraging this ability to conceive and design new medical products and procedures can affect thousands more patients than a single surgeon can ever treat in a career. Look no further than Dr Michael DeBakey as a shining example of a surgeon-innovator who has saved more lives through pioneering cardiac surgical techniques and products than he could ever treat personally.
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      References

      1. The Harris poll #21.
        • Yeo H.L.
        • Kaushal R.
        • Kern L.H.
        The adoption of surgical innovations at academic versus nonacademic health centers.
        Acad Med. 2017; https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001932