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Commentary: This is what we do

      Every surgeon knows novelty wears off quickly in the operating room. Indeed, novelty is replaced by focus, intense concentration, step-by-step decisions, vision, judgment, an increased heart rate,
      • Whitney D.C.
      • Ives S.J.
      • Leonard G.R.
      • VanderBrook D.J.
      • Lawrence J.P.
      Surgeon energy expenditure and substrate utilization during simulated spine surgery.
      and enough sweat to make brow-wiping a staple of old TV doctor shows. And that’s just interacting with the electronic record. No, our work is different. As much as we celebrate innovation, the operating room is not the place we want to be figuring out new stuff for the first time.
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      References

        • Whitney D.C.
        • Ives S.J.
        • Leonard G.R.
        • VanderBrook D.J.
        • Lawrence J.P.
        Surgeon energy expenditure and substrate utilization during simulated spine surgery.
        J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2019; 27: e789-e795
        • Thompson J.L.
        • Zarroug A.E.
        • Matsumoto J.M.
        • Moir C.R.
        Anatomy of successfully separated thoracopagus-omphalopagus conjoined twins.
        Clin Anat. 2007; 20: 814-818