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Invited commentary on: Attrition among early-career transplant surgeons: Root causes and resolutions

Published:December 21, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2022.11.032
      Attrition in any profession can occur for many reasons—personal or lifestyle reasons, changes in professional role, etc. However, one would reason that attrition in a surgical profession such as transplant would be relatively low, given the limited career opportunities. Although the job market for newly minted transplant surgeons has varied over decades, with debate about supply and demand,
      • Reich D.J.
      • Magee J.C.
      • Gifford K.
      • et al.
      Transplant surgery fellow perceptions about training and the ensuing job market—are the right number of surgeons being trained?.
      the high attrition rate reported by the authors is in fact among early-career surgeons who started their postgraduate careers performing transplant surgeries. The authors do concede that the 24.4% attrition rate is likely inflated given the authors’ definition of attrition. Some surgeons labeled as “attrit” in this study may have decided to enter a career mostly performing general surgery, vascular access, and deceased donor procurements. Because they are not primary surgeons on transplant cases, they may be labeled as attrit. What remains unknown is why these surgeons opt to focus on practices related to but separate from the full spectrum of transplant surgery.
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